BURLINGTON, Ont. - Delaware and Seneca Ave. in South Central Burlington is a prime example of infill housing in a mature neighbourhood. The construction of larger houses in this quaint community has caused outcry amongst some of the residents. The residents started a group on Facebook and have made signs to voice their opinions about what is happening in their neighbourhood.

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This home on Delaware Ave. has been torn down by a builder and replaced with a larger home that doesn’t match the characteristics of the ones surrounding it.

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Photographed is an example of the cookie cutter houses that the residence of these streets want to avoid. The houses have the exact same interior layout and only minor differences to the exterior.

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Graham White lives on Delaware Ave. He says, “what the people coming into our neighbourhood are doing is really intensification.”

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Modern houses, such as the one photographed, are becoming more and more popular. The residents of Delaware and Seneca do not believe this style of home is fitting to the character of their neighbourhood.

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Nancy Henderson lives on Delaware Ave. and has lived in her home for 15 years. “There’s a lot of confusion, a lot of angst,” Henderson says about the issues in her community.

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Nancy Henderson holds a baby while she walks down her street. Henderson sees the community as her home and enjoys the fact that she lives in a friendly neighbourhood.

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Gregg Rhodes lives on Delaware Ave. Rhodes was awarded a Heritage Award in 1990 for the maintenance of the wood siding of his home.

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Gregg Rhodes’ home, when he won a Heritage Award in 1990, was considered an A Home, which is a heritage home. Since the infill of the newer houses in Rhodes’ community, his home has been downgraded to a C Home and can now potentially be bought and torn down.

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Because the surroundings in the area have been modernized, a beautiful heritage home is no longer protected.

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Jan Christmas (the smallest child on the right) grew up in her house on Delaware Ave. until she was 17 and she has now moved back in where she lives with her husband. Christmas believes that what is happening is, “basically decimating our environment and our neighbourhood.”

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Photographed is a newer home next to a smaller, older home.

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Cindy Consentino stands in front of her previous home on Seneca Ave. Consentino recently moved from this home to a larger home on the same street. She says that the new house being built beside her house contributed to her moving.

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Cindy Consentino stands in front of her new home with her husband, down the street from her previous home, on Seneca Ave. Consentino loved the community and neighbourhood of Seneca so much that she decided to stay in the area.

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The community is filled with large, old trees that contribute to the character of the neighbourhood.

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 DIVIDED COMMUNITY

This social issue project focuses on a mature neighbourhood in Burlington, Ontario where infill housing is becoming a huge issue for some residents. Smaller, older houses are being demolished and replaced by larger "cookie cutter" style houses.

I was introduced to this issue by my aunt, Jan Christmas.

Click the photos to read more.

To read a full article on this topic click here.